Saturday, September 20, 2014

WHY LARGE NUMBERS OF AMERICANS AND CITIZENS OF WESTERN COUNTRIES ARE JOINING THE JIHADI ISLAMIST ? THE ANSWER IS SIMPLE IT IS ISLAM. OTHER RATIONALIZATIONS ARE ONLY EXCUSES. THEY ARE SERIOUS ABOUT THE MOST CORRUPT BRIBE THEY HAVE RECEIVED FROM ALLAH IF THEY GO TO HEAVEN FIGHTING THE NON-BELIEVERS.


Tracing shift from everyday American to jihadis

Associated Press 
In this Sept. 10, 2014 photo, Ana and John Conley, parents of defendant Shannon Conley, exit the U.S. Federal courthouse following their daughter's plea hearing, at the U.S. Federal Courthouse, in Denver.   Shannon Conley, a 19-year-old suburban Denver woman who federal authorities say intended to wage jihad has pleaded guilty under a deal that requires her to give authorities information about others with the same intentions.   With foreign fighters from dozens of nations pouring into the Middle East to join the Islamic State group and other terrorist organizations, U.S. officials are putting new energy into trying to understand what radicalizes people far removed from the fight and into prodding countries around the world to do a better job of keeping them from joining up.  (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
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In this Sept. 10, 2014 photo, Ana and John Conley, parents of defendant Shannon Conley, exit the U.S. Federal courthouse following their daughter's plea hearing, at the U.S. Federal Courthouse, in Denver. Shannon Conley, a 19-year-old suburban Denver woman who federal authorities say intended to wage jihad has pleaded guilty under a deal that requires her to give authorities information about others with the same intentions. With foreign fighters from dozens of nations pouring into the Middle East to join the Islamic State group and other terrorist organizations, U.S. officials are putting new energy into trying to understand what radicalizes people far removed from the fight and into prodding countries around the world to do a better job of keeping them from joining up. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
WASHINGTON (AP) — A college dropout from Florida. A nurse's aide from Denver. The owner of a pizza-and-wings joint from upstate New York.
Except for their embrace of Islam, there's no common profile for the 100-plus Americans who have traveled to Syria to join Islamic fighters or are accused of supporting them from the United States.
Their reasons for joining an extremist cause a half-world away are as varied as their geography and life stories.
Some seek adventure and camaraderie. Others feel a call to fight perceived injustice.
But a common strain of disaffection, a search for meaning, seems to emerge, at times stronger than any motivation tied to religious devotion.
"What unifies all these folks is a desire to be recognized, a desire to find a cause that they can mold their life to," says Evan Kohlmann, who tracks terrorists with Flashpoint Global Partners.
Foreign fighters from dozens of nations are pouring into the Middle East to join the Islamic State group and other terrorist organizations. U.S. officials are putting new energy into trying to understand what radicalizes people far removed from the fight, and into trying to prod countries to do a better job of keeping them from joining up.
On Wednesday, President Barack Obama will lead a meeting of the 15-member U.N. Security Council as part of the effort to stem the flow of foreign nationals. Next month, the White House will hold a conference on the radicalization of Americans.
It's an increasingly urgent matter now that the U.S. and allies are directly attacking Islamic State fighters. There are concerns of blowback that encourages more terrorism at home.
Just last week, a post on a top jihadi forum urged American Muslims who can't reach the battlefront to wage "an aggressive and sustained campaign of lone-wolf attacks" locally, according to the SITE Intelligence Group. As well, there are worries that fighters with U.S. passports will return home to carry out attacks in America or with airplanes headed to the U.S.
The transition from everyday American to foreign fighter for a group that trumpets the beheading of its enemies may start with concern that fellow Muslims are being killed abroad. It often includes Internet chatrooms and online conversations with extremists. It may involve knowing someone who's radicalized. Many cite the teachings of radical U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, who was killed in a U.S. drone strike in Yemen in 2011 but whose words are still influential in cyberspace.
Moner Mohammad Abusalha, 22, who grew up playing basketball in Vero Beach, Florida, described his journey to jihadism in a video before he killed himself and 16 others in a suicide bombing in Syria last May. He mentioned both the teachings of al-Awlaki and the influence of friend.
The college dropout, whose father was Palestinian and mother was Italian-American, said of his life as a Muslim in America: "This never was a place for me. ... I was always sad and depressed. Life sucked."
"I want to rest in the afterlife, in heaven," he said. "Heaven is better."
Shannon Conley, 19, a nurse's aide from suburban Denver, wanted to marry an Islamic extremist fighter she met online and thought she could use her U.S. military training to fight a holy war overseas. In pursuing her Muslim faith, "she was exposed to teachings through which she was terribly misled," her lawyer, Robert Pepin, wrote in a court filing. Conley pleaded guilty to trying to help Islamic militants and is awaiting sentencing.
In the most recent case, 30-year-old Mufid Elfgeeh, a pizza and food mart owner from Rochester, New York, was indicted last week for trying to help three people travel to Syria to join extremist fighters. A naturalized citizen from Yemen, Elfgeeh was arrested this year for buying guns as part of a plan to kill U.S. service members.
Elfgeeh has pleaded innocent.
While the ranks of foreign fighters from America include both naturalized citizens and the native-born, Kamran Bokhari of Stratfor global intelligence said second-generation Muslim Americans trying to balance two cultures could be particularly vulnerable.
"It's natural for the second generation to be feeling sort of lost and not knowing who they are," he said. They may feel drawn to the plight of Muslims abroad, and feel guilty about living comfortable lives, he added.
For all the concern about Americans who support Islamic militants, terrorism experts say the problem is much worse in Europe, where Muslims are not as wealthy or assimilated. Several hundred people from Britain have traveled to Syria, according to official estimates, and France and Germany have estimated a combined 1,300 of their citizens have joined the fight.
Aaron Zelin, an expert on jihadi groups at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said roughly half the Americans who have joined the Islamic State group are converts to Islam. The rest typically are born Muslim or "reverts," people who were Muslim at birth, but didn't practice the faith until later in life, he said.
"I would argue that they converted to jihadism, not necessarily mainstream Islam," he said.
Attorney General Eric Holder pointed to the indictment of Elfgeeh as evidence that U.S. officials are aggressively working to identify and disrupt those who want to join or support terrorist groups.
Critics say the administration's efforts have been largely cosmetic and that officials haven't done enough to understand root causes.
"You have to understand who is being radicalized, why they are being radicalized and how they are being radicalized, and I don't think the U.S. government really has a good handle on that," Kohlmann said.
U.S. officials point to recent success at preventing major terrorist attacks, but Kohlmann said it would be overly optimistic to think the government can closely monitor every American who joins extremist causes. While the Islamic militants' chief focus remains in Syria, he said there is plenty of rhetoric exhorting sympathizers to target Westerners.
"Take these people at their word. Because they mean it."
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Follow Benac on Twitter at http://twitter.com/nbenac and Riechmann at http://twitter.com/debriechmann

REVERSING PROSELYTIZATION INITIATED BY HINDUS TO STAHL THE EVIL PRACTICE OF CONVERSION BY ISLAM AND EVANGELICALS IN INDIA


Friday, September 19, 2014

EUROPEAN PEOPLE OF MUSLIM BACKGROUND ARE ADDING FUEL TO THE FIRE OF ANTI-SEMITISM, CARRYING A "VICTIM ROLE" FOR THEMSELVES BUT RE-VICTIMIZING THE VICTIMS OF HOLOCAUST


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HAMBURG, Germany — Europe is living through a new wave of anti-Semitism. The president of Germany’s Central Council of Jews calls it the worst the Continent has seen since World War II. He may well be right. Attacks on synagogues are an almost weekly occurrence, and openly anti-Semitic chants are commonplace on well-attended marches from London to Rome. And yet it is here, in Germany, where the rise in anti-Semitism is most historically painful.
On Sunday, thousands of people marched through Berlin in response, and heard both Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Joachim Gauck denounce the resurgence in anti-Jewish hatred.
We’ve seen this before, of course. But there’s an important difference this time. The new anti-Semitism does not originate solely with the typical white-supremacist neo-Nazi; instead, the ugly truth that many in Europe don’t want to confront is that much of the anti-Jewish animus originates with European people of Muslim background.
Until recently, Germany has been unwilling to discuss this trend. Germans have always seen Muslim anti-Semitism as a less problematic version of the “original” version, and therefore a distraction from the well-known problem of anti-Jewish sentiment within a majority of society.
And yet the German police have noted a disturbing rise in the number of people of Arabic and Turkish descent arrested on suspicion of anti-Semitic acts in recent years, especially over the last several months. After noticing an alarming uptick in anti-Semitic sentiment among immigrant students, the German government is considering a special fund for Holocaust education.
Of course, anti-Semitism didn’t originate with Europe’s Muslims, nor are they its only proponents today. The traditional anti-Semitism of Europe’s far right persists. So, too, does that of the far left, as a negative byproduct of sympathy for the Palestinian liberation struggle. There’s also an anti-Semitism of the center, a subcategory of the sort of casual anti-Americanism and anticapitalism that many otherwise moderate Europeans espouse.
But the rise of Muslim anti-Semitism is responsible for the recent change in the tone of hate in Germany. Until recently, the country’s anti-Semitism has been largely coded and anonymous. Messages might be spray-painted on walls at night; during the day, though, it would be rare to hear someone shout, as protesters did in Berlin in July, “Jews to the gas!” Another popular slogan at this and other rallies was “Jew, coward pig, come out and fight alone!” — shouted just yards from Berlin’s main Holocaust memorial. And this is the difference today: An anti-Semitism that is not only passionate, but also unaware of, or indifferent to, Germany’s special history.
Talking to Muslim friends, I can’t help but believe that the audacity of today’s anti-Semitism is in part a result of the exploitation of a “victim status,” an underdog sentiment that too many European Muslims have embraced enthusiastically. This is not just the sort of social-science explanation we often hear for hatred, as racism from people who are themselves the victims of racism and discrimination.
Yes, there is discrimination against and exclusion of Muslims in Europe, and many of them certainly have reason to be frustrated. But this sentiment is more complex, born not only from how someone feels about himself and his neighbors, but about himself and his country. It is twofold: Germany’s history is not my history. And: I’ll never fully belong to your nation anyway, so why should I take on its burdens as you do?
One friend, whose parents are from Turkey, told me that when she learned about the Holocaust at her German school, she wondered what all that had to do with her biography. As someone born in 1973, though with blond hair, I could ask the same question.
The point is, it’s not about personal involvement; it is not in our blood, but it is in our history, in the timeline of a place that migrants have become part of. For Germans, accepting responsibility for the Holocaust has to mean feeling ultimately and more than any other nations’ citizens responsible for keeping the memory of its horrors alive — simply because those crimes were ordered from our soil.
Nothing more, but also nothing less has to be expected from every citizen of this country, no matter where her or his parents are from.
What has become obvious this summer is that the “old” Germans have not yet managed to properly deliver this message to all the “new” Germans. Emotionally, this may have been understandable, given how many “bio-Germans,” as we call ethnic Germans, actually had Nazi family members that they still got to know, which may have made them wary of telling others what to think.
But the lesson of the Holocaust is a lesson for mankind. And it’s every German’s job to make that clear at all times and to everyone, regardless of where you think you come from.
Jochen Bittner is a political editor for the weekly newspaper Die Zeit.

GLOBAL JIHAD STARTS FRANCHISES FOR SPREADING JIHAD IN INDIA AND MYANMAR


AL QAEDA ANNOUNCED NEW INDIAN BRANCH


WARNING ! -AL QAEDA ANNOUNCED NEW
 
 INDIAN BRANCH



Al-Qaeda leader Ayman Al Zawahiri has announced, on 09/03/2014, the formation of an Indian branch of his global armed group that he said would spread Islamic rule and "raise the flag of jihad" across the subcontinent.

In a video spotted in online "jihadist" forums on Wednesday by the SITE terrorism monitoring group, Zawahiri said the new force would "crush the artificial borders" dividing Muslim populations in the region.

Using the notion that  the new force would "crush the artificial borders" , Ayman Al Zawahiri is clearly imitating the rising power of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadiin the Levant and his ambitions to erase the “Colonial” borders of the Middle East.  Zawahiri said the group would take the fight to India, Myanmar andBangladesh.

"This entity was not established today but is the fruit of a blessed effort of more than two years to gather the mujahedeen in the Indian sub-continent into a single entity," he said (see also - INDIAN Mujahideen).

But since the death of its figurehead Osama Bin LadenFollowing the Abbottabad Raid, on 05/02/2011, Al Qaeda has been somewhat eclipsed, first by its own offshoots in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, and now by the so-called "Islamic State" I-S fighting in Iraq and Syria.

Iin launching "Qaedat al-Jihad in the Indian sub-continent," Zawahiri may be attempting to recapture some of the limelight for his group and to exploit existing unrest in Kashmir and Myanmar. "It is an entity that was formed to promulgate the call of the reviving imam, Sheikh Osama bin Laden, may Allah have mercy upon him," Zawahiri said.

Zawahiri said the group would recognise the overarching leYAadership of the Afghan Taliban leader Mullah Muhammad Omar and be led day-to-day by senior Pakistani fighter Asim Umar.
 
The 55-minute video begins with stock footage of the late bin Laden giving a sermon, before cutting to a satellite map of southwest Asia, the Middle East, the Indian sub-continent and the Horn of Africa (East Africa).

Asim Umar also speaks in the video - using the Urdu language of Pakistan rather than the Egyptian doctor Zawahiri's native Arabic - along with a new group spokesman identified as Usama Mahmoud.

The video is produced by Al-Qaeda's usual media arm, the As-Sahab Media Foundation - "The Cloud" - and SITE reported that it had been widely distributed on jihadist online forums.

* WARNING !

** There is a reason for a major concern that the Al Qaeda and the rising “Islamic State” will now compete each other over leading the Global Jihad and catch the attention of Islamists all over the world with mega terror attacks with special priority to the Western Democracies.
 
* Related topics ;